How Canadian Viagra Can Alleviate Menstrual Cramps

Known under many names like “the little blue pill,” vitamin V, and the strict ‘Sildenafil citrate,’ Canadian Viagra is a drug that has quite a presence in mainstream media and culture. Since it was introduced to the public, Viagra has attracted overwhelmingly positive reviews and earned the reputation for solving the male erectile dysfunction problem once and for all. Although medical researchers have already uncovered thorough information regarding how the drug affects men and how it should be used, little research has been done to see whether women can similarly benefit from it. Alleviate Menstrual Cramps

If we look at the matter superficially, it might seem like Viagra is unsuitable for women due to obvious differences in anatomy and reproductive systems. However, specialists will tell you that the drug affects patients’ genital region regardless of their gender, age, and other factors stereotypically used to exclude anyone who doesn’t fit society’s perception of the target consumers. Thankfully, a study funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health has taken the initiative in this regard and investigated Viagra’s effect on an exclusively female condition – menstrual cramps.

The aim of this study was to see if Viagra could relieve the pain experienced by women with dysmenorrhea. Dysmenorrhea is a medical term that refers to painful period and cramps during menstruation. This is not an illness per se, but it affects a significant percent of the female population and causes significant discomfort for periods of up to three days, impairing productivity and overall well-being.

It should be mentioned that similar studies were conducted before, in which women took the drug orally, unlike this recent effort that involved the vaginal application of Canadian Viagra – more at www.mycanadianpharmacyrx.com. Previous studies showed that Viagra significantly eased the pelvic pain in women, but the common side effects (like headache) that women experienced after taking it made the drug counterproductive. In contrast, this new study did not result in the same significant side effects. The 25 women who participated in the study had either the Viagra drug or a placebo administered vaginally at the Nova Gradska General Hospital in Croatia.

After the drug had been administered, patients were asked to monitor and record their levels of pain over the next four hours. After collecting the records and analyzing them based on who took the placebo and who received a dose of the actual drug, researchers determined that those who took the drug reported much lower pain levels with few (if any) side effects. These findings supported the theory that Viagra increased oxygen-filled blood flow to the affected area, producing relief for the pain.

While this study was labelled a great success by many health experts, it also produced some serious questions and implications. For example, women who took the placebo treatment also experienced increased blood flow to the uterus but did not experience the same levels of relief as women who got a dose of Viagra, causing many to wonder what the pain relief was actually prompted by.

Due to the fact that women make up half of our population and hundreds of millions of them experience overtly painful periods, there is no doubt that the findings of this study will further the perception of Viagra as a drug for both genders and prompt further research in how it can be modified to best serve women. In fact, there are several other studies that have already studied the other effects of Viagra on women, such as stimulating arousal and pleasure during sexual activities. In the near future, men will probably continue buying Canadian Viagra online at www.mycanadianpharmacymall.com, but women have every chance of eventually joining this movement as well.